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NC State Biochemistry

 

 

John Cavanagh
William Neal Reynolds Professor of Biochemistry

Education:
PhD, University of Cambridge
Postdoctoral, The Scripps Research Institute

Contact:
Office: 357 Polk Hall
Phone:
   Office: 919.513.4349
   Wet Lab: 919.513.4347

Other important members:
Laboratory Manager - Ms. Richele Thompson (Room 350/352)
Research Assistant Professor - Dr. Ben Bobay (Room 150)
Post-doctoral fellow: Dr. Andrew Olson (Room 350)


Email: John Cavanagh

John Cavanagh

Website: Visit our Lab Home Page

Research Areas: NMR spectroscopy | protein structures and protein:protein/DNA/metal recognition and interactions

The Cavanagh lab is generally interested in how the specific structure and inherent flexibility of proteins helps them carry out their biological roles.

For a few years and with some success, our main focus has been on proteins involved in bacterial response/protection and the development of infectious disease. These are proteins that enable bacteria survive in difficult circumstances/environments and help them reach their pathogenic potential. The main types of proteins we study are response regulator proteins and transition state regulator proteins. Please see our 'Research' section for a little more information.

We are also very interested in neurodegenerative processes such as Alzheimer's disease. We have been studying the role of the calcium-binding protein calbindin D28K in suppressing the onset of Alzheimer's. Calbindin D28K appears to regulate both the amyloid and neurofibrillary tangle pathologies that define the disease.